A brief narrative of the struggle for the rights of the Colored people of Philadelphia… : and a defence of William Still… -- Page 6

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Title: A brief narrative of the struggle for the rights of the Colored people of Philadelphia… : and a defence of William Still… -- Page 6
Document Title: A brief narrative of the struggle for the rights of the Colored people of Philadelphia in the city railway cars : and a defence of William Still, relating to his agency touching the passage of the late bill : Read before a large public meeting, held in Liberty Hall, Lombard St. below Eighth, Apr. 8th, 1867.
Author: Still, William, 1821-1902
Date: 1867
Page Transcription:
6 day and hour was fixed for our Committee to appear with our petition, and appeal before their body. The result was published in the next day's papers. I copy from the Evening Bulletin the notice which appeared in its columns : Colored People in Passenger Cars. At the monthly meeting of Passenger Railway Presidents, held yesterday at No. 25 Merchants' Exchange, a committee of colored men, consisting of Wm. Still, J. C. Wears, S. M. Smith, and Rev. J.C. Gibbs, of the 1st Presbyterian Colored Church, presented a petition to the following effect. " Petition for the Colored People of Philadelphia to Ride in the Cars. "To the Board of Managers of the various City Passenger Cars: "The colored citizens of Philadelphia suffer very serious inconvenience and hardship, daily, by being excluded from riding in the city passenger cars. In New York City, and in all the principal northern cities, except Philadelphia, they ride ; even in New Orleans (although subject to some proscription), they ride in the cars. Why then should they be excluded in Philadelphia,—in a city standing so pre-eminently high for its benevolence, liberality, love of freedom, and Christianity, as the city of brotherly love? "Colored people pay more taxes here than is paid by the same class in any other northern city. The members of the 'Social and Statistical Association' although numbering less than fifty members, pay annually about Five Thousand Dollars into the Tax Collector's office. "Therefore, the undersigned respectfully petition that the various Boards of the city passenger cars rescind the rules indiscriminately excluding colored persons from the inside of the cars." This petition was signed by hundreds of white citizens, among whom are to be found the names of Bishop Potter, Horace Binney, Morton McMichael, Gibson Peacock, Rev. Phillips Brooks, Daniel Dougherty, Rev. Thomas Brainard, D. D., M. C. Cope, &c. Mr. Wm. Still read a communication to the Board of Presidents, embodying certain arguments in favor of the petition. Mr. Gambles, of the Chestnut and Walnut Street Road, moved that the petition be granted ; but, after some discussion, the subject was postponed until the next meeting of the Board. The Christian Recorder, printed June 14, 1862, editorially noticed this petition movement in the following remarks : We call the attention of our readers to an effort nobly made,—we mean wisely and prudently made,—in behalf of the colored people of Philadelphia, in which Mr. Wm. Still is one of the leading pioneers. His persevering labors have procured at least three hundred and sixry of the most prominent white citizens of this*city to sign a petition to the Board of Presidents of the city railways, in behalf of colored persons. We cannot but believe that such an effort will be crowned with success, for it has touched the sympathies of our white friends. We copy, in another column, a few lines from the Evening Bulletin, relative to the matter, and we present to oar readers the touching appeal delivered by Mr. Still before the Board of Presidents of the city passenger cars.
Subject:
African Americans--Civil rights
African Americans--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia
Street-railroads--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia
Segregation in transportation--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia
Notes:
Cover title.
Format: image/jp2
Type: Pamphlets
Publisher: Philadelphia / Merrihew & Son, Printers
Physical Description: 1 pamphlet: 22 cm.
Number of Pages: 28
Rights: This material is made available for private study, scholarship, and research use. For access to the original photograph or high-resolution image, please contact the Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection (blockson@temple.edu; 215-204-6632).
Language: English
Repository: Temple University Libraries, Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection
Digital Collection: William Still Collection
Digital Publisher: Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Libraries
Document ID: BPHX00002