William Still: An African-American Abolitionist -- Bibliography

Includes citations for all primary and secondary source materials referenced in this site

By Aslaku Berhanu

 

Allen Richard. The Life, Experience and Gospel Labors of the Rt. Rev. Richard Allen; to which is Annexed the Rise and Progress of the African Methodist Episcopal Church in the United States of America … Written by Himself and Published by His Request.  n.p.:  n.d.

____. “Autobiography of Richard Allen,” in Wright, Richard R. The Bishops of the African Methodist Episcopal Church.  Nashville: The A.M.E. Sunday School Union, 1963, 46-76.

Anderson, Caroline Still. Letter to Edward, 18 June 1873. William Still Collection. Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection, Temple University Libraries, Philadelphia, PA.

____. Letter to Fielding, 28 May 1878. William Still Collection. Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection, Temple University Libraries, Philadelphia, PA.

Anderson, Matthew. Presbyterianism : its Relation to the Negro. Philadelphia: J.M. White, 1897.

____. Report of the Berean Enterprise Read at a Round Table Talk of Friends of the Berean School, December 12th, 1912.

Bacon, Margaret Hope. Valiant Friend: the Life of Lucretia Mott. New York: Walker and Co., 1980.

Beckford, Geraldine Rhoades. "Anderson, Caroline Virginia Still Wiley." Oxford African American Studies Center, 2010.  Accessed on 13 January 2012 at <http://www.oxfordaasc.com/article/opr/t0001/e1889>.

Bentley, Judith. Dear Friend: Thomas Garrett & William Still, Collaborators on the Underground Railroad. New York: Cobblehill Books, 1997.

Blockson, Charles L. African Americans in Pennsylvania: Above Ground and Underground, an Illustrated Guide. Harrisburg: RB Books, 2001.

____. The Underground Railroad. New York: Prentice-Hall, 1987.

____. The Underground Railroad in Pennsylvania. Jacksonville: Flame International, 1981.

Brown, Ira Vernon. The Negro in Pennsylvania History. University Park, PA: Pennsylvania Historical Association, 1970.

Buckmaster, Henrietta. Let My People Go: The Story of the Underground Railroad and the Growth of the Abolition Movement. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1941.

Coffin, Levi. Reminiscences of Levi Coffin, the Reputed President of the Underground Railroad: Being a Brief History of the Labors of a Lifetime in Behalf of the Slave, with the Stories of Numerous Fugitives, Who Gained Their Freedom through His Instrumentality, and Many Other Incidents. Cincinnati: Western Tract Society, 1876.

DeBlasio, Donna M. "American Anti-Slavery Society."In Encyclopedia of African American History, 1619-1895: From the Colonial Period to the Age of Frederick Douglass. Paul Finkelman, ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2008.Oxford African American Studies Center. Last accessed on Monday, May 14 09:53:11 EDT 2012. http://www.oxfordaasc.com/article/opr/t0004/e0019

“Dissolution Of Peoples’ Savings Bank of Philadelphia, Pa.” in Afro-American, 22 Feb. 1918. Last accessed on14 May 2012, on web: Baltimore Afro-American (1893-1988) on ProQuest Historical Newspapers (Legacy Platform).

Du Bois, W. E. B. The Philadelphia Negro: a Social Study. Philadelphia: Published for the University, 1899.

Forten, Charlotte L. The Journals of Charlotte Forten Grimke. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988.

Gara, Larry. "William Still and the Underground Railroad." Pennsylvania History 28:1 (January 1961): 33-44.

Gerson, Noel Bertram. Harriet Beecher Stowe: a Biography. New York: Praeger Publishers, 1976

Hall, Stephen G. "To Render the Private Public: William Still and the Selling of the Underground Railroad." The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography (January 2003): 35-55.

Hine, Darlene Clark. "Co-Laborers in the Work of the Lord: Nineteenth-century black women physicians." In R. J. Abram, ed. Send Us a Lady Physician: Women Doctors in America, 1835-1920. New York: Norton, 1985, 107-120.

Horton, James Oliver. "A Crusade for Freedom: William Still and the Real Underground Railroad." In David W. Blight, ed., Passages to Freedom: The Underground Railroad in History and Memory. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Books, 2004, 174-193.

Jerrido, Margaret. "In Recognition of Early Black Women Physicians," Women & Health 5:3 (1980): 1-3.

Kashatus, William C. "Two Stationmasters on the Underground Railroad: A Tale of Black and White." Pennsylvania Heritage 27 (Fall 2001): 4-11.

Khan, Lurey. One Day, Levin … He be Free: William Still and the Underground Railroad. New York: Dutton, 1972.

____. William Still and the Underground Railroad: Fugitive Slave and Family Ties. New York: iUniverse Inc., 2010.

Lane, Roger. William Dorsey’s Philadelphia and Ours: On the Past and Future of the Black City in America. New York: Oxford University Press, 1991.

Lee, Jarena. “The Life and Religious Experience of Jarena Lee, a Coloured Lady, Giving an Account of Her Call to Preach the Gospel. Revised and Corrected from the Original manuscript, Written by Herself.” In Sisters of the Spirit: Three Black Women’s Autobiographies of the Nineteenth Century. William L. Andrews, ed. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1986, 25-48.

Lapsansky, Emma Jones. “’Discipline to the Mind’: Philadelphia’s Banneker Institute, 1854-1872.” The Pennsylvania Magazine of History & Biography 117:1/2 (Jan./April 1993): 83-102.

Majors, Monroe Alphus. Noted Negro Women: Their Triumphs and Activities. Chicago: Donohue & Henneberry, 1893.

Nash, Gary B. Freedom by Degrees: Emancipation in Pennsylvania and its Aftermath. New York: Oxford University Press, 1991.

_____. Forging Freedom: The Formation of Philadelphia’s Black Community, 1720-1840. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1988.

______. “’To Arise out of the Dust’: Absalom Jones and the African Church of Philadelphia, 1785-95.”Race, Class, and Politics: Essays on American Colonial and Revolutionary Society. Ed. Nash. Urbana:University of Illinois Press, 1986. 323-355.

Peitzman, Steven J.  A New and Untried Course; Woman’s Medical College and Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1850-1998.  New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University press, 2000.

Pickard, Kate E. R. The Kidnapped and the Ransomed. Being the Personal Recollections of Peter Still and His Wife " Vina," after Forty Years of Slavery. Syracuse: W. T. Hamilton, 1856.

Pollard, Leslie James. Complaint to the Lord: Historical Perspectives on the African American Elderly. Selinsgrove, [Pa.]: Susquehanna University Press, 1996.

Porter, Dorothy B. “The Organized Educational Activities of Negro Literary Societies, 1828-1846.” The Journal of Negro Education. 5:4 (Oct. 1836): 555-576.

Quarles, Benjamin. Allies for Freedom: Blacks and John Brown. New York: Oxford University Press, 1974.

Saunders, John A. 100 Years After Emancipation: History of the Philadelphia Negro, 1787 to 1963. Philadelphia: Free African Society, 1964.

Siebert, Wilbur Henry. The Underground Railroad from Slavery to Freedom. Gloucester, Mass.: P. Smith, 1968, c1898.

Sillen, Samuel. Women Against Slavery. New York: Masses & Mainstream, 1955.

Simmons, William J. Men of Mark: Eminent, Progressive and Rising. Cleveland: G. M. Rewell, 1887.

Still, James. Early Recollections and Life of Dr. James Still, 1812-1885. Medford, N.J. Medford Historical Society, 1971.

Still, James Thomas. “Don’t Tell White Folks”: or Light out of Darkness. Boston: J. Still, 1889.

Still, William. A Brief Narrative of the Struggle for the Rights of the Colored People of Philadelphia in the City Railway Cars; and a Defence of William Still, Relating to His Agency Touching the Passage of the Late Bill, &c. Read Before a Large Public Meeting, Held in Liberty Hall, Lombard St. Below Eighth, Apr. 8th, 1867. Philadelphia: Merrihew & Son, 1867.

_____. The Underground Rail Road. A Record of Facts, Authentic Narratives, Letters, &c., Narrating the Hardships, Hair-Breadth Escapes and Death Struggles of the Slaves in their Efforts for Freedom, as Related by Themselves and Others, or Witnessed by the Author; Together with Sketches of Some of the Largest Stockholders, and Most Liberal Aiders and Advisers of the Road. Philadelphia: Porter & Coates, 1872.

______. Still's Underground Rail Road Records: with a Life of the Author: Narrating the Hardships, Hairbreadth Escapes and Death Struggles of the Slaves in their Efforts for Freedom: Together with Sketches of Some of the Eminent Friends of Freedom, and Most Liberal Aiders and Advisers of the Road. Philadelphia: William Still, 1886.

_____. Letter to Caddy. 13 August 1867. William Still Collection, Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection, Temple University Libraries, Philadelphia, PA.

_____. Letter to Caddy. 1 February 1876. William Still Collection. Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection, Temple University Libraries, Philadelphia, PA.

_____. Letter to Caddy. 6 March 1876. William Still Collection. Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection, Temple University Libraries, Philadelphia, PA.

_____. Letter to Caddy. 7 March 1879. William Still Collection. Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection, Temple University Libraries, Philadelphia, PA.

_____. Letter to Carrie. 30 April 1866. William Still Collection. Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection, Temple University Libraries, Philadelphia, PA.

_____. Letter to Carrie. 5 March 1868. William Still Collection. Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection, Temple University Libraries, Philadelphia, PA.

Switala, William J. Underground Railroad in Pennsylvania. Mechanicsburg, Pa.: Stackpole Books, 2001.

Wells, Susan. Out of the Dead House: Nineteenth-Century Women Physicians and the Writing of Medicine. Madison: The University of Wisconsin Press, 2001.

White, Charles Frederick. Who's Who in Philadelphia: a Collection of Thirty Biographical Sketches of Philadelphia Colored People ...Together with Cuts and Information of Some of their Leading Institutions and Organizations. Philadelphia: The A.M.E. Book Concern, 1912, 17-19.

Wilson, Joseph. Sketches of the Higher Classes of Colored Society in Philadelphia. Philadelphia: Merrihew and Thompson, 1841.